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One Of My Amazon.Com Reviews



(Formatting Question: How do I get my text to wrap around the graphic which I want to put toward the left instead of having it appear under the graphic that I have centered for aesthetic reasons?)

I reviewed George G. Hunter’s The Celtic Way of Evangelism several years ago, but I have erased that review upon rereading the book. When I first read Hunter’s work, I was entranced by the resurgence of interest in Celtic Christianity and missed the entire point of the book in favor of learning more about this unique historical expression of Christianity.

Now, five years later, time and experience have dramatically driven home the importance of making the Gospel of Christ relevant to the present culture without sacrificing the meaning of the message which is the real point of Hunter’s book.

Hunter does spend a great deal of time analyzing and exploring the history of how Christianity spread in the British Isles, but only to demonstrate how the Celtic Christian evangelists spread the message of Christ. Hunter’s point is that the evangelists communicated Christianity’s timeless truths in a way that the ancient Celts could understand it through the grid of their own culture without sacrificing the integrity of the message of the Gospel.

Today, in the post-Christian world of the West, the church mostly finds its message ignored, not because of the lack of power in the gospel, but because we refuse to speak to today’s culture in language that can be understood. Most churches, trapped in the world of the perceived Golden Age of 1950’s Christianity, are unaware they have made the truths of the Gospel irrelevant and incomprehensible.

Hunter’s encouragement is that the western churches can still evangelize a world of civilized pagans if we would only discern the difference between the unchanging message of Christ and the constantly changing culture of the world around us; that the former is sacred and the latter can too easily become a golden cow that makes a stumbling block to the unconverted.

Hunter does give practical and workable ways in which to evangelize using the ancient Celtic Christians as a model. Also, this specific reviewer found Chapter 7’s description on how the Church can respond to a culture that is becoming increasingly addicted to self-defeating and self-destructive behaviors worth the price of the book.

Comments

( 7 comments — Leave a comment )
dajagr
Aug. 9th, 2007 12:58 am (UTC)
If you're using HTML and not RTF, something like this should work:
<IMG src="mypicture.jpg" align="left">
(I'm not familiar enough with RTF to make suggestions.)
stokerbramwell
Aug. 9th, 2007 01:04 am (UTC)
Hmm...now that makes me ponder indeed...
cindmouse
Aug. 9th, 2007 01:05 am (UTC)
WOW! That sounds EXTREMELY interesting!
jairus_greywolf
Aug. 9th, 2007 02:51 am (UTC)
"Today, in the post-Christian world of the West, the church mostly finds its message ignored, not because of the lack of power in the gospel, but because we refuse to speak to today’s culture in language that can be understood."

I would agree with that statement in as far as liturgical churches go but I think more and more churches w/o liturgies are doing a good job at speaking relevantly and in a manner that's easily understood. The biggest hurdle that I see is countering the stereotypical image of the church that the media has pounded into everyone.
ashenfox
Aug. 9th, 2007 03:32 am (UTC)
The two most paralyzing cultural forces I see at work today are the "I can decide for myself what is true" camp, and the "you leave me alone, and I'll leave you alone" camp. Both are extremely hostile to any dissenting viewpoint, no matter how well and gently presented. It may take years to break through to people like that.
eric_hinkle
Aug. 9th, 2007 08:13 pm (UTC)
Sounds like a good book.
kengara
Aug. 10th, 2007 04:07 am (UTC)
Hm, and I hear so much about how churches have watered down the message so much to make it more appealing to this culture :/
( 7 comments — Leave a comment )